News

At the VA's Million Veterans Program, precision medicine is fast becoming reality

For over five years now, consenting veterans have been donating their genomic data to the Department of Veterans Affairs, or VA, in one of the largest precision medicine big data projects in the world. And after collecting over 470,000 samples since 2011, analysis on the data is now underway.

Flint-inspired Michigan bill ending FOIA exemptions for governor, legislature faces opposition

Prompted in part by the contaminated water crisis in Flint, Michigan, a committee of the state legislature has approved a series of measures to expand government transparency, including ending the blanket exemption to Freedom of Information Act rules for the governor and legislature.

DMI develops mobile app, virtual database to help manage US military cemeteries

DMI, a Bethesda, Md.-based enterprise mobility firm, announced this week that is developing a mobile app for internal cemetery operations, as well as a common virtual database and network environment, for more than 42 U.S. military cemeteries.

European Parliament wants changes to the Privacy Shield deal reached between EU, US negotiators

The European Parliament wants changes in the Privacy Shield deal reached in February between EU and the U.S. government negotiators that would replace the 15-year-old Safe Harbor framework transfer Europeans' data to the United States.

Spotlight: Cyber weapons unlikely to get WMD-like treaty

Banning cyber weapons can't take the same approach as a treaty to ban the use of weapons of mass destruction, a post at Defense Systems argued yesterday. Part of the problem is that the term "cyber weapons" is itself ambiguous.

DoD's antiquated computer system still uses floppy disks to control US nuclear forces, GAO finds

The Department of Defense still uses 8-inch floppy disks as part of a system for sending emergency messages to nuclear forces, an audit by the Government Accountability Office found.

US Postal Service sees potential in blockchain technology

The U.S. Postal Service is looking to use blockchain technology to shore up its systems while saving money, according to a new report by the agency's Office of Inspector General.

EPIC to OPM: Stop collecting sensitive job applicant information if you can't secure the data

Saying federal agencies are "incapable of adequately protecting sensitive information from improper disclosure," a privacy watchdog group this week urged the Office of Personnel Management to limit the amount of personal information it collects on job applications and focus instead on data protection.

State Department IG criticizes Clinton's email practices as secretary of state

In a report due out soon, the State Department's Office of the Inspector General is highly critical of Hillary Clinton's email practices while she was U.S. secretary of state.

Spotlight: US still lacking countrywide data breach notification law

The U.S., despite 47 states having their own notification laws, lacks a single, national law at the federal level.

TSA and SSA move ahead with Windows 10 upgrade

The Transportation Security Administration and the Social Security Administration are both on track to upgrade their systems to the Windows 10 operating system, representatives from both agencies confirmed at a Fedscoop this week.

Galois gets $10M DARPA contract to make legacy military, commercial systems less vulnerable

Galois, a Portland, Ore.-based security firm, announced Wednesday that it has been awarded a $10 million contract by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to make cyber security vulnerabilities in the code bases of legacy military and commercial communications systems less exploitable.

Whitescope wins $200,000 DHS award for IoT security gateway

The Department of Homeland Security has awarded $200,000 to Whitescope to create a secure wireless communications gateway for Internet of Things devices.

Spotlight: CMS 'data guardians' on watch after phishing attempts

CMS, compelled by the then-recent hack of the Office of Personnel Management, went into containment mode after it was targeted by phishing attempts and aimed to inform its employees of cybersecurity best practices.

Report: In mixed cloud landscape, hybrid IT rules agencies

Nearly every government agency has begun migrating to the cloud, but the cloud is not ideal for every workload, so most agencies think it is unlikely they will move completely to cloud resources.

Contracting officer to join GSA's newest technology service

As 18F settles into its new home as part of the General Services Administration's Technology Transformation Service, or TTS, the innovation team is preparing for a new contracting officer.

Report: Minnesota restricts access to government records easily available in other states

Access to government records routinely available online in many other states is so restricted in Minnesota that the Center for Public Integrity gave the state an "F" in public record access in its 2015 State Integrity report, KARE-TV in Minneapolis reported.

Clinton email hacker to plead guilty

The hacker who says he broke into Hillary Clinton's personal email server while she was U.S. secretary of state will likely plead guilty to criminal charges this week.

Michigan's Allegan County ponies up $10M for new 911 system

Allegan County, Mich., plans to spend up to $10 million to deploy a new emergency 911 system over the next year, reported the Holland Sentinel via Emergency Management.

Spotlight: Navy seeks industry help to boost weapons-systems cybersecurity

The Naval Air Systems Command is looking for outside help to improve its weapons-systems cybersecurity capabilities.